Bicycle Saftey Check this Thursday

This Thursday evening Muscle Powered and the Carson City Health Department will doing a bicycle safety check! From 5-7pm on April 7th, we will have a booth setup at Telegraph Square at the crossroads of Telegraph and Curry Streets to help celebrate National Public Health Week.

Carson City
Telegraph Square

Thursday’s theme is Safety on the Move. It’s been a long winter, and those bikes have been sitting for a while. Bring your bicycles on down and let us make sure you’re ready to roll safely! Also, Muscle Powered and the Carson City Health Department will have some give-aways and info to hand out. Hope to see you there!

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Happy Kids / Healthy Kids Event

Happy Kids/Healthy Kids

On Saturday, November 13th, there will be a Family Fun event at the Carson Mall from 11:00AM to 1:00PM. This event is FREE and open to all families interested in staying healthy. There will be entertainment, games, prizes, and free health screenings, and many local groups including Muscle Powered will be on hand to help educate children and adults about living a healthy lifestyle.

2010 Hike for Health Trails Challenge

The Carson Valley Trails Association invites you to join their 2010 Hike for Health Challenge!

2010 Hike for Health Trails Challenge Flyer Final2
2010 Hike for Health Trails Challenge

The Carson Valley Trails Association is kicking off a month long Hike-for-Health Challenge. It’s a fundraiser that will help build the 24 mile trail system that begins in Genoa and connect to the Tahoe Rim Trail. It runs from April 22nd – May 23rd.

The silent auction, live auction & raffle kicks off tonight from 5-8pm at the Genoa Town Hall. Spread the word!

Fewer Cars = Healthier Kids

Another interesting post on Streetsblog New York, this time about research that correlates proximity to traffic with kids health.

“Children living within 150 meters of high-traffic areas were found to have, on average, BMIs five percent higher than those living near low-traffic areas.┬áThe researchers put forward two explanations for why high traffic contributes to obesity. The first is that real or perceived danger from cars reduces walking and biking. The other is that too much traffic contributes to high asthma rates, which make physical activity more difficult and less frequent.”