A greenway on Nevada St?

Please watch the StreetFilms video on Portland’s neighborhood greenways, and think about the applicability and practicability for Carson City.

Portland has a grid street system, except for the west hills and the far suburbs, and Carson City does not have a grid except in a few areas, so it is difficult to identify locations where a street parallel to the arterials and collectors could be prioritized for bicycle use.

But Nevada Street immediately popped into my mind. It runs a fair distance, about 1-1/2 miles from nearly Winnie Lane on the north to 10th Street on the south. It is already a fairly calm street, so it would require less traffic calming than would many other streets. A few speed humps (like the one on Division Street), a reduction in the speed limit to 15 or 20 mph, bulb outs and/or bicycle and pedestrian passthroughs at major street crossings (Fifth Street certainly, and perhaps Musser, Robinson, Washington and Long) to discourage through motor traffic, and orienting signs for bicycle free flow, would create a bicycle friendly route.

As shown in the video, the greenways create comfortable and practical routes for all sorts of bicyclists, not just regular commuters who feel comfortable riding in traffic. I can imagine it being a part of our yearly Bike to Work Week cruiser ride. The route passes close to Fritsch Elementary School, and is not far from Bordewich Elementary. It also provides access to downtown from both the north and the south.

The idea is that only people who live on Nevada Street would be using their motor vehicles on Nevada Street. Others might be on for a short distance, and would use cross streets, but the nature of the street would be a place friendly to and safe for bicyclists, pedestrians, kids, dogs, etc.

What do you think? Would it work in Carson City? Is Nevada Street the best place for a pilot? What traffic calming actions would make the most difference? What other streets might be good candidates? How would you make use of the neighborhood greenway?

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20 is plenty!

20 mph residential street

I love StreetFilms! There is nothing like the visual to cause one to reconsider what one thinks one knows. And here is a film short on 20 mph speeds on residential streets in England, theĀ 20 is Plenty, For Us campaign. Most of the streets shown either were narrow to begin with, or have traffic calming measures installed, so our widest streets in Carson City would need something done to them to make this practical. Just imagine, though, drivers and bicyclists and pedestrians sharing streets as common space rather than funnels for impatience and pollution.

Watch the video here: 20’s Penty For Us from Streetfilms on Vimeo.

Veronica Moss Visits Times Square

Here’s a good look at what happens when you reclaim the urban environment from heavy motorized use!

Veronica Moss Visits Times Square
by Clarence Eckerson on Streetfilms.org

She’s back! The woman you love to hate (and hate not to love) Veronica Moss, a Washington, D.C. lobbyist for – ahem! – the Automobile User Trade Organization (A.U.T.O.) In this “chapter”, she’s getting her first gander ever at the new pedestrian-friendly Times Square and she invited Streetfilms along to record her virgin journey.

Continue reading and watch the video over on Streetfilms.org